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Boiling point

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Reference
Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
From 11 June 2012 to 06 July 2012
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Study conducted in compliance with international standard guidelines under GLP conditions. The study report was well documented with all mandatory information included
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 103 (Boiling point/boiling range)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes (incl. QA statement)
Remarks:
11-04-11
Type of method:
method according to Siwoloboff
Boiling pt.:
> 101.69 - < 102.11 °C
Atm. press.:
101.325 kPa
Decomposition:
no

Evaluation

The boiling temperature at standard pressure can be calculated following the equation of Sidney-Young (only for small pressure deviations)

 Tn  = T + ( f*Dp)       

with

Tn          =           boiling point at 101.325 kPa in K
T           =           measured boiling point in K
f            =           tabulated value (0.31 for temperature 373.15 K)

Dp         =           (101.325 – p) kPa
p           =           measured atmospheric pressure in kPa

Correction factors are temperature-related, as can be taken from the following table:

Temperature

fT(K/kPa)

323.15

0.26

348.15

0.28

373.15

0.31

398.15

0.33

423.15

0.35

448.15

0.37

473.15

0.39

498.15

0.41

523.15

0.44

548.15

0.45

573.15

0.47

Results

The following observations were made:

Determination

Boiling Point

Atmospheric Pressure

Correction
Sydney Young

First determination

101.1 °C (374.3 K)

996.0 hPa

101.7 °C (374.8 K)

Second determination

101.4 °C (374.6 K)

996.2 hPa

102.0 °C (375.1 K)

 Mean ± standard deviation (Correction Sydney Young) = 101.9 ±0.21 °C(375.0 ± 0.21 K).



Conclusions:
The boiling point of the test item was determined as 101.9 ± 0.21 °C (corresponding to 375.0 ± 0.21 K).
Executive summary:

The boiling point of the test item was determined according to the Method 103 of OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals 27 July 1995,Method A2 Boiling point of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440 /2008 of 30 May 2008 and GLP. No deviation from the Guideline was observed during the test.

The boiling point was determined with the Siwoloboff Method.The test item was filled into a sample tube containing a ebullition capillary tube in such a manner that the sealed part of the capillary is lying below the surface of the test item. The sample tube was then set into a aluminium block. For the increase of the temperature, a temperature gradient of1 K/min was maintained.When bubbles rose constantly on the ebullition capillary, heating was turned down, and, cooling slowly, the ebullition capillary was observed constantly. The moment at which the chain of bubbles broke was recorded as boiling point (together with the appropriate atmospheric pressure).

The boiling point of the test item was determined as 101.9 ± 0.21°C (corresponding to 375.0 ± 0.21K). This value is the mean of two independent determinations. As the boiling point of water at 1013 hPa is 100°C and the test item is a aqueous solution, the result of 101.9°C is plausible. Therefore, the result of the study is considered valid

Description of key information

Experimental boiling point : 101.9 ± 0.21°C (corresponding to 375.0 ± 0.21K)

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Boiling point at 101 325 Pa:
101.9 °C

Additional information

The experimental determination of the boiling point test was performed with Siwoloboff Method according to Method A2 Boiling point of Commission Regulation (EC) No 440 /2008 of 30 May 200, Method 103 of OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals 27 July 1995 and GLP. No deviation from the Guideline was observed during the test

As the boiling point of water at 1013 hPa is 100°C and the test item is a aqueous solution, the result of 101.9°C is plausible.