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Ecotoxicological information

Toxicity to aquatic plants other than algae

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
toxicity to aquatic plants other than algae
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: no GLP

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Long-term effects of heavy metals on aouatic plants
Author:
van der Werff, M.; Pruyt, M. J.
Year:
1982
Bibliographic source:
van der Werff, M.; Pruyt, M. J., Long-term effects of heavy metals on aouatic plants. Chemosphere 1982, 11, (8), 727-739.

Materials and methods

GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Comparing submerged (Elodea) and partly submerged (Callitriche) with floating species (Lemna) shows reduced heavy metal content for the floating ones. Except copper all the other heavy metals including lead salts tested gave no clear toxic symptoms, e.g. growth rate or mortality due to heavy metal uptake, in the plants tested
Executive summary:

In long-term experiments lasting up to 73 days the effect of rather low levels of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium on the growth and metal uptake was studied by investigating four aquatic plant species: Elodea nuttallii, Callitriche plataycarpa, Spirodela plolyrhiza and Lemma gibba. Except Elodea, which was already very sensitive to 5 µmol Cu l-1, no differentiation in growth or mortality could be detected depending on species or elements. There was a clear differentiation between the uptake levels of the heavy metals with regard to the plant species, resulting in a higher heavy metal content in the submerged species in comparison to the floating ones. For lead, an equal ratio was detected between the concentration in the medium and in the plant tissue independent of the plant species. Except copper all the other heavy metals gave no clear toxic symptoms in the tested plants, because there was not any difference in growth rate or mortality due to metal up-take. The involvement of roots in element absorption by aquatic plants and the possibility of using aquatic plants as indicators of heavy metal pollution are discussed.