Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

The substance is not classified for the environment (or human health). It is therefore considered unnecessary to derive PNECs, as a full PEC/PNEC comparison is not required.

Conclusion on classification

The substance is not classified for the environment based on the results of acute toxicity studies in fish, Daphnia and algae, plus relevant physico-chemical properties such as water solubility and partition coefficient.

The results of the acute toxicity studies are shown below:

Acute toxicity to fish: 96 hour LC50: >100 mg/l; NOEC: 100 mg/l

Acute toxicity to Daphnia: 48 hour LC50: >100 mg/l; NOEC: 100 mg/l

No effects were observed in fish or Daphnia up to the highest tested concentration of 100 mg/l.

The most sensitive species was the algae, whcih gave the following results:

Growth rate: 72 hour EC50: 86 mg/l; NOEC: 1.0 mg/l

The algal result of 86 mg/l is not sufficient for classification of the substance on its own (in CLP Chronic Category 3, for substances with 72 hour EC50 results of >10 to ≤100 mg/l) as the substance does not meet the other criteria required for this classification, which state the substance must also be not rapidly biodegradable and/or have an experimentally determined BCF ≥ 500 (or log Pow ≥4),

The substance has a log Pow of -3.84 and does therefore not meet this classification criteria.

The substance is an inorganic and therefore has not been tested for biodegradability, so the criteria for biodegradablity is not relevant. However, inorganic substances may be transformed by normal environmental processes to either increase or decrease the bioavailability of the toxic species. A hydrolysis study shows the substance is stable (half life estimated as >1 year) suggesting the substance will undergo rapid hydrolysis in water to a more bioavailable species.

It is therefore considered that the substance does not meet the criteria for environmental classification.