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Environmental fate & pathways

Phototransformation in soil

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Endpoint:
phototransformation in soil
Type of information:
other: review article
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
secondary literature
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to same study
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to other study
Principles of method if other than guideline:
no data
GLP compliance:
not specified
Radiolabelling:
not specified
Analytical monitoring:
not specified
Light source:
other: high-pressure mercury arc lamp
Light spectrum: wavelength in nm:
254
Relative light intensity:
90
Quantum yield (for direct photolysis):
0
Transformation products:
not specified
Validity criteria fulfilled:
no
Conclusions:
Solid sodium azide is stable against photodegradation as the quantum yield after exposure to the full output of a high-pressure mercury arc lamp (254 nm) is 0.001.
Executive summary:

Solid sodium azide is stable against photodegradation as the quantum yield after exposure to the full output of a high-pressure mercury arc lamp (254 nm) is 0.001.

Endpoint:
phototransformation in soil
Type of information:
other: handbook data
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: handbook data lacking methodological details
Details on results:
Since surface applied sodium azide is readily leached into soil, photodecomposition is not an important means of dissipation. In acid soils, sodium azide is readily converted to hydrazoic acid, which is highly volatile, moves readily through the soil, and can account for a major part of azide dissipation unless some type of vapor seal is employed.
Executive summary:

Since surface applied sodium azide is readily leached into soil, photodecomposition is not an important means of dissipation. In acid soils, sodium azide is readily converted to hydrazoic acid, which is highly volatile, moves readily through the soil, and can account for a major part of azide dissipation unless some type of vapor seal is employed.

Description of key information

Since surface applied sodium azide is readily leached into soil, photodecomposition is not an important means of dissipation. In acid soils, sodium azide is readily converted to hydrazoic acid, which is highly volatile, moves readily through the soil, and can account for a major part of azide dissipation unless some type of vapor seal is employed (WSSA 1983).

Solid sodium azide is stable against photodegradation as the quantum yield after exposure to the full output of a high-pressure mercury arc lamp (254 nm) is 0.001 (Betterton 2003).

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information