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Toxicological information

Dermal absorption

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
dermal absorption
Type of information:
read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
study well documented, meets generally accepted scientific principles, acceptable for assessment

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Reducing systemic absorption from monochloracetic acid exposure through dermal decontamination: use of the pig ear organ culture system.
Author:
Bruijnzeel PLB et al
Year:
1998
Bibliographic source:
J. Toxicol. Cut. Ocular Toxicol. 17 (2&3), 111-126

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The rates of percutaneous penetration and dermal accumulation of radiolabeled MCA were measured using the blood-perfused pig ear model.
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Constituent 1
Chemical structure
Reference substance name:
Chloroacetic acid
EC Number:
201-178-4
EC Name:
Chloroacetic acid
Cas Number:
79-11-8
Molecular formula:
C2H3ClO2
IUPAC Name:
2-Chloro-ethanoic acid
Details on test material:
[14C]MCA was used for the permeation studies (Sigma, 444 MBq/mmol). No further details specified.
Radiolabelling:
yes
Remarks:
[14C]MCA

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Maximum rates of percutaneous penetration (ng/min/cm2; mean + SEM) were 891 ± 335 for a 1 -min exposure, 947 ± 191 for 3 -min exposure ; and 3221 ± 515 for a 10 - min exposure.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Although the initial rate of percutaneous absorption (first 30 min) was directly related to the exposure time, there was no difference in maximal rates of percutaneous penetration for 1- and 3-min exposures. It appears, that for short exposure times, the percutaneous penetration rate is determined by both the rate of penetration into the skin and the rate of diffusion from dermal stores into the blood.
A saturated sodium bicarbonate solution and water proved equally effective in decontaminating the skin after a 10-min exposure to MCA. However, a saturated bicarbonate solution was a slightly more effective decontaminant than water after a 1-min exposure. The data indicate that decontamination should take place as soon as possible after dermal contamination with MCA. Furthermore, decontamination should continue for as long as possible in order to reduce the systemic burden.