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Physical & Chemical properties

Auto flammability

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Description of key information

Troclosene sodium is not considered to be auto flammable based on experience in handling, DTA and ARC data. 

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Additional information

Millions of pounds of anhydrous NaDCC have been used over a period of over 40 years to treat water. Over all of this experience, there is no indication of any flammability when anhydrous NaDCC is mixed with water. Anhydrous NaDCC itself is not flammable and no flammable gases are generated when anhydrous NaDCC is dissolved in water.

The self-ignition temperature for solids can also be determined by Accelerating Rate Calorimetry (ARC). This is very similar to the A.16 test but is done on a smaller scale. The ARC data shows two exotherms, a small exotherm starting at about 115°C and a large exotherm starting at about 220°C. The 115°C exotherm is due to reaction of the anhydrous NaDCC with the small amount of moisture released from the solid. The size of this endotherm is proportional to the amount of bound water in the anhydrous NaDCC and is almost non-existent for product with < 0.2% moisture. Thus, well-dried anhydrous NaDCC shows essentially no exotherm at temperatures less than 220°C. The 220°C exotherm is due to decomposition of the anhydrous NaDCC. This decomposition generates a large amount of heat and gas, resulting in a pressure of about 900 psia (61 atm) in the sealed sample cell. [DTA and ARC data for anhydrous NaDCC]

DTA (Differential Thermal Analysis) shows a small endotherm in the 75-110°C, due to the release of a small amount of bound water. The size of this endotherm is proportional to the amount of bound water in the anhydrous NaDCC and is almost non-existent for product with < 0.2% moisture. DTA shows a large exotherm starting at about 236°C, due to the decomposition of anhydrous NaDCC. [DTA and ARC data for anhydrous NaDCC]

The 220°C exotherm in the ARC data corresponds to the 236°C exotherm seen by DTA. The DTA temperature might have been lower if the scanning rate was slower.

DTA, TGA and DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) data was also reported in Wanjek (1987) and the results agree well with the data above.