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Toxicological information

Specific investigations: other studies

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
cytotoxicity
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Comparative Cytotoxicity of DQl2 Quartz and Fly Ash Particles from Coal Combustion
Author:
Hill, J.O. and Hobbs, C.H.
Year:
1982
Bibliographic source:
Toxicology Letters, 10 (1982) 399-403

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
Fly ash samples obtained from different coal combustors were tested for cytotoxicity to alveolar macrophages in vitro by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture media.
GLP compliance:
no
Type of method:
in vitro

Test material

Constituent 1
Reference substance name:
Ashes (residues), coal
EC Number:
931-322-8
Cas Number:
68131-74-8
Molecular formula:
Not applicable (UVCB substance)
IUPAC Name:
Ashes (residues), coal
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): Baghouse filter or electrostatic precipitator samples of fly ash were obtained from six different coal combustors throughout the United States. The in vitro cytotoxicities of the ashes were compared with a positive reference standard, DQ12 quartz, obtained from the Dörentrup deposits in the Federal Republic of Germany.

Test animals

Species:
dog
Strain:
Beagle
Sex:
not specified

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
other: in medium
Vehicle:
other: culture medium
Duration of treatment / exposure:
24 h
Frequency of treatment:
single
Post exposure period:
not applicable
No. of animals per sex per dose:
not applicable

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Ashes from six different coal combustors were tested. Ash samples derived from the combustion of coal were not toxic to macrophages in vitro at concentrations up to 200 µg/106 cells (1000 µg/culture). In addition, ash derived from different coals burned in a single combustor were also not cytotoxic. Ashes derived from the combustion of Montana Rosebud sub-bituminous (3 samples), Texas Lignite (1 sample), and Western Kentucky Bituminous (1 sample) in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor were similarly nontoxic. At the same concentration, the quartz induced the release of 56% of all LDH recoverable by cell sonication (EC50 = 100 pg/106 cells).

Applicant's summary and conclusion