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Link to relevant study record(s)

Description of key information

Short description of key information on bioaccumulation potential result: 
A GLP-study similar to OECD guideline 417 is available for ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate.
Short description of key information on absorption rate:
A GLP-study on percutaneous absorption through rat skin in vitro is available for ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Bioaccumulation potential:
no bioaccumulation potential

Additional information

A GLP-study to determine the metabolic fate and disposition of Ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate (EEP) in male rats following a single oral gavage administration has been conducted. EEP was rapidly absorbed, metabolized and excreted by male rats following oral gavage administration of doses of 150 or 1500 mg/kg. A substantial proportion of each dose was eliminated as CO2, indicating that the molecule was completely oxidized. The majority of the remaining portion of each dose was eliminated in the urine within 24 hours of dosing. The major urinary metabolites were ethoxypropionic acid, the monoethyl ester of malonic acid and the glycine conjugate of 3-ethoxypropionic acid. No evidence was found for the production of alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, such as those produced by the metabolism of some low molecular weight ethylene glycol ethers. These metabolic data are consistent with the low acute toxicity of EEP.

In addition a GLP-study study on percutaneous absorption is available. Exposure to the chemical caused a small but significant increase in the permeability of rat skin, as demonstrated by a mean damage ratio of about 5.3, compared with a damage ratio of about 1.4 for skin not exposed to EEP.

Discussion on bioaccumulation potential result:

A GLP-study to determine the metabolic fate and disposition of Ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate (EEP) in male rats following a single oral gavage administration has been conducted. EEP was rapidly absorbed, metabolized and excreted by male rats following oral gavage administration of doses of 150 or 1500 mg/kg. A substantial proportion of each dose was eliminated as CO2, indicating that the molecule was completely oxidized. The majority of the remaining portion of each dose was eliminated in the urine within 24 hours of dosing. The major urinary metabolites were ethoxypropionic acid, the monoethyl ester of malonic acid and the glycine conjugate of 3-ethoxypropionic acid. No evidence was found for the production of alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, such as those produced by the metabolism of some low molecular weight ethylene glycol ethers. These metabolic data are consistent with the low acute toxicity of EEP.

Discussion on absorption rate:

Exposure to the chemical caused a small but significant increase in the permeability of rat skin, as demonstrated by a mean damage ratio of about 5.3, compared with a damage ratio of about 1.4 for skin not exposed to EEP.