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Physical & Chemical properties

Partition coefficient

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
partition coefficient
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
From March 18, 1989 to July 26, 1989
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
study report
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1989
Report date:
1989

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
other: EU Method A.8
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
yes
Type of method:
flask method
Partition coefficient type:
octanol-water

Test material

Constituent 1
Test material form:
solid

Study design

Analytical method:
photometric method

Results and discussion

Partition coefficient
Key result
Type:
log Pow
Partition coefficient:
-3.2
Temp.:
25 °C
pH:
> 6.42 - < 6.55
Remarks on result:
other: Average of 6 readings at three different concentrations

Any other information on results incl. tables

Table 2: Readings
Sample 1 2 3 4 5 6
Absorbance 1 cm cell, 415 nm water phase 0.297 0.625 0.314
0.298 0.612 0.300
Concentration in Water Phase (µg/mL) 10861 5714 2871
10898 5595 2743
Absorbance 1 cm cell, 425 nm, n-Octanol Phase
0.110 0.023 0.042
0.114 0.023 0.040
Concentration in n-Octanol Phase (µg/mL) 9.0 1.2 5.7
9.4 1.2 5.5
Total Amount Detected (mg) 162.9 28.6 57.4
163.5 28 54.9
Log P = Log (Concn. In n-Octanol Phase / Concn. In H2O Phase) -3.0809 -3.6778 -2.6990
-3.0655 -3.6778 -2.6990
Average Log P -3.2
pH aquous Phase 6.55 Not tested  6.42

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Under the study conditions, the log Pow of the test substance was determined to be -3.2 at 25°C.
Executive summary:

A study was conducted to determine the partition coefficient of the substance according to EU method A.8. Under the study conditions, the Log Pow of the test substance was determined to be -3.2 at 25 °C (Williams, 1989).