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Boiling point

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Reference
Endpoint:
boiling point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
11 February - 9 April 2002
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study with acceptable restrictions
Remarks:
Possible boiling was observed during the thermal analysis (DSC) of the test item
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to same study
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 103 (Boiling Point)
Version / remarks:
Possible boiling was observed during thermal analysis using DSC to determine the melting point according to the OECD guideline102 and EC method A.2
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
EU Method A.2 (Boiling Temperature)
Version / remarks:
Possible boiling was observed during thermal analysis using DSC to determine the melting point according to the OECD guideline102 and EC method A.2
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of method:
differential scanning calorimetry
Specific details on test material used for the study:
- Batch n°: ZR027180PUG231
- Analytical purity: 99.3%
- Expiration date: 9 November 2006
- Storage condition: at room temperature, 10 to 30°C
Key result
Boiling pt.:
ca. 235 °C
Atm. press.:
1 013.25 hPa
Decomposition:
yes

Initial Scan

Two thermal events were observed. A sharp endothermic peak was observed between ca. 129 and 133°C and was assumed to be the melting point. A broad endotherm commencing at 235°C was also present, and its shape, together with the appearance of a red-brown residue in the pan after testing, indicating that the test substance had boiled with a chemical change.

It was decided to proceed with a second scan to identify whether or not the former represented a true melting.

Additional Scan — Boiling or Chemical Change Event

There was a broad endotherm present commencing at 238°C which had a very similar peak shape to the initial scan, demonstrating good replication between the two scans.

The second endotherm is assumed to be due to boiling of the test material. The jagged nature of the peak indicates that a chemical change may have occurred. This is supported by the observation that the appearance of the residue in the pan had changed to a red-brown glassy solid.

Conclusions:
A boiling point (possible boiling or chemical change) was observed for the test item commencing at 235°C.

Description of key information

In a key study (K2, Bates, 2002) according assessing the thermal behaviour of the test substance by differential scanning calorimetry, a boiling point (possible boiling or chemical change) was determined commencing at 235°C.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

A boiling point (possible boiling or chemical change) was determined commencing at 235°C.

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