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Toxicological information

Acute Toxicity: oral

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
acute toxicity: oral
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
data from handbook or collection of data
Remarks:
peer-reviewed OECD SIDS report
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
read-across source
Remarks:
link to target
Reference
Endpoint:
acute toxicity: oral
Type of information:
read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
data from handbook or collection of data
Remarks:
peer-reviewed OECD SIDS report, read-across substance
Justification for type of information:
REPORTING FORMAT FOR THE ANALOGUE APPROACH
1. HYPOTHESIS FOR THE ANALOGUE APPROACH
The ideal structure of the registered substance is a complex which consists of iron2+ as central ions and a hemiprophyrazine ring as ligand. Therefore, the endpoint in question may be both covered with data on Fe2+ salts as well as hemiprophyrazines and structurally related substances. So the read-across can be performed on both common functional groups and common breakdown products, as the read-across substances are considered breakdown products of the target substance.

2. SOURCE AND TARGET CHEMICAL(S) (INCLUDING INFORMATION ON PURITY AND IMPURITIES)
Source Chemicals, for individual read-across from an analogue in the required endpoints:
- Iron dichloride, CAS 7758-94-3
- Copper, (29H,31H-phthalocyaninato(2-)-kappaN29,kappaN30,kappaN31,kappaN32)-, ((3-(dimethylamino)propyl)amino)sulfonyl derivs., CAS 68411-04-1
- Copper phthalocyanine, CAS 147-14-8
Target Chemical:
(8,20-Dihydro-8,20-diphenyl-5,24:12,17-diimino-7,10:22,19-dinitrilodibenz(f,p)(1,2,4,9,11,12,14,19)
octaazacycloicosinato(2-)-N25,N26,N27,N28)iron, CAS 50293-39-5
All substances do not contain impurities to an extent which is expected to alter the outcome of the experimental results or read-across approach.

3. ANALOGUE APPROACH JUSTIFICATION
There are no data on the respective endpoints for all read-across substances available, but if data is available on all endpoints, a clear trend is available. So in general, read-across is justified. In detail, for the single possible structural analogues, the following is concluded:
CAS 7758-94-3: Both substances contain a Fe2+ ion, and with respect to acute oral toxicity, the substance provides the worst case scenario. So an underestimation of the actual risk here is unlikely. With regard to skin sensitization, iron does not need to be regarded, as it is an endogenous substance and no cases of sensitization were ever reported. Regarding gene mutation in bacteria, it was consistently with all the other possible analogues negative, so read-across is justified. For the irritation endpoints, it is not suitable, as based on the counterion, there are acidic iron salts available, clearly overestimating the possible hazard.
CAS 68411-04-1 / CAS 147-14-8: both source and target chemical contain structurally highly related chelating rings, i.e. a hemiprophyrazine ring or a phthalocyanine ring, they predominantly only differ in the central ion. The organic ring bearing all the chelating nitrogen atoms are identical, the only differ in the way the benzyl rings are attached, which are nevertheless identical chemical groups. With regard to acute oral toxicity, their acute oral LD50 values are way above the limit of classification, the precautionary classification of the target chemical as Acute tox. Cat. 4 does certainly not underestimate the actual risk. Regarding gene mutation in bacteria, all possible analogues are consistently negative ±S9. With regard to irritation and sensitisation, the organic functional groups are more relevant than the central ions, so read-across is also here justified.

4. DATA MATRIX
There is currently no data on the target chemical available, so an estimation using a worst case approach based on the properties of the available surrogates will be used:
Property CAS 50293-39-5 (target) CAS 7758-94-3 (source 1) CAS 68411-04-1 (source 2) CAS 147-14-8 (source 3)
LD50 (oral) Acute tox. Cat. 4 >300, <2000 mg/kg (rats) > 5000 mg/kg (rats) > 10000 mg/kg (rats)
>16000 mg/kg (rabbits)
Skin irritation Not irritating No data No data Not irritating
Eye irritation Not irritating No data No data Not irritating
Skin sensitization Not sensitizing No data No data Not sensitizing
Gene mutation in bacteria Negative ± S9 Negative ± S9 (OECD 471) Negative ± S9 (OECD 471) Negative ± S9 (various assays)
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
read-across source
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 423 (Acute Oral toxicity - Acute Toxic Class Method)
Deviations:
not specified
GLP compliance:
yes
Test type:
acute toxic class method
Limit test:
no
Species:
rat
Strain:
Sprague-Dawley
Sex:
female
Details on test animals or test system and environmental conditions:
not available
Route of administration:
oral: unspecified
Vehicle:
not specified
Details on oral exposure:
Three Sprague-Dawley female rats were tested at each step and a starting dose of 300 mg/kg b.w. was selected. There was no mortality in the first three rats dosed with 300 mg/kg b.w. To confirm the starting dosage, three more rats were tested. In the second 300 mg/kg b.w. group, one animal was dead after one day. At the limit dosage of 2,000 mg/kg b.w., all three rats died after one hour of administration.
Doses:
300, 2000 mg/kg
No. of animals per sex per dose:
3
Control animals:
other: not required
Details on study design:
- Duration of observation period following administration: 14 days
- Necropsy of survivors performed: yes
- Other examinations performed: clinical signs, body weight
Key result
Sex:
female
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
> 300 - < 2 000 mg/kg bw
Based on:
test mat.
Remarks on result:
other: only range of LD50 value was given
Mortality:
There was no mortality in the first three rats dosed with 300 mg/kg b.w. To confirm the starting dosage, three more rats were tested. In the second 300 mg/kg b.w. group, one animal was dead after one day. At the limit dosage of 2,000 mg/kg b.w., all three rats died after one hour of administration.
Clinical signs:
There were no effects on body weight increase in all surviving animals. The typical clinical signs of tested animals at 2,000 mg/kg b.w. were nasal discharge, hypoactivity, piloerection, prone position, reddish change and edema on ears, fore-legs and hind-legs. At 300 mg/kg b.w., all animals showed hypoactivity and piloerection on day 1 and some animals showed soft stool on day 2. However, these clinical signs were recovered to the normal status from day 3.
Body weight:
There were no effects on body weight increase in all surviving animals.
Gross pathology:
The necropsy of the tested animals at 2,000 mg/kg b.w. showed hemorrhage on lymphatic nodes, stomach, intestine and thymus. Also, there was hypertrophy of pancreas and spleen. In one dead animal of the 300 mg/kg b.w. group, hemorrhage on lymphatic nodes and intestine was observed.
There was no abnormality observed by microscopic examination of the surviving animals of the 300 mg/kg b.w. group after sacrifice on day 15.
Interpretation of results:
Category 4 based on GHS criteria
Conclusions:
Information was gathered from a peer-reviewed report / collection of data, hence, the information can be considered as sufficiently reliable to assess the acute oral toxicity of the test item. The LD50 value for acute oral toxicity of rats was between 300 and 2,000 mg/kg body weight, hence, it must be classified as acute toxic Cat. 4 acc. Regulation 1272/2008.
Executive summary:

In a toxicity test performed by OECD TG 423 (Acute Toxic Class Method) with GLP control, the LD50 value of the test item for acute oral toxicity of females Sprague-Dawley rats was between 300 and 2,000 mg/kg body weight.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
review article or handbook
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
2004

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
according to guideline
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 423 (Acute Oral toxicity - Acute Toxic Class Method)
Deviations:
not specified
GLP compliance:
yes
Test type:
acute toxic class method
Limit test:
no

Test material

Constituent 1
Reference substance name:
Iron dichloride
EC Number:
231-843-4
EC Name:
Iron dichloride
Cas Number:
7758-94-3
IUPAC Name:
iron(2+) dichloride
Test material form:
solid
Remarks:
commercial product: liquid
Details on test material:
Water solubility : 650 g/L at 25 °C
Molecular Weight: 126.75
Synonyms:
Iron chloride (FeCl2)
Ferrous chloride
Ferrous chloride (FeCl2)
Ferrous dichloride
Iron protochloride
Iron(2+) chloride
Iron(II) chloride
Iron(II) chloride (FeCl2)
Iron(II) chloride (1:2)
Iron dichloride is in the form of white rhombohedral crystals and sometimes it has a green tint and the substance is very hygroscopic. Iron dichloride dihydrate (FeCl2•2H2O) is in the form of white monoclinic crystals with a pale green tint and loses 1 H2O at 120 °C. Also the substance is reported to lose 1 H2O at 150 – 160 °C. Iron dichloride tetrahydrate (FeCl2•4H2O) is in the form of pale green to blue-green monoclinic crystals or cryst powder and loses 2 H2O at 105 – 115 °C

Test animals

Species:
rat
Strain:
Sprague-Dawley
Sex:
female
Details on test animals or test system and environmental conditions:
not available

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
oral: unspecified
Vehicle:
not specified
Details on oral exposure:
Three Sprague-Dawley female rats were tested at each step and a starting dose of 300 mg/kg b.w. was selected. There was no mortality in the first three rats dosed with 300 mg/kg b.w. To confirm the starting dosage, three more rats were tested. In the second 300 mg/kg b.w. group, one animal was dead after one day. At the limit dosage of 2,000 mg/kg b.w., all three rats died after one hour of administration.
Doses:
300, 2000 mg/kg
No. of animals per sex per dose:
3
Control animals:
other: not required
Details on study design:
- Duration of observation period following administration: 14 days
- Necropsy of survivors performed: yes
- Other examinations performed: clinical signs, body weight

Results and discussion

Effect levels
Key result
Sex:
female
Dose descriptor:
LD50
Effect level:
> 300 - < 2 000 mg/kg bw
Based on:
test mat.
Remarks on result:
other: only range of LD50 value was given
Mortality:
There was no mortality in the first three rats dosed with 300 mg/kg b.w. To confirm the starting dosage, three more rats were tested. In the second 300 mg/kg b.w. group, one animal was dead after one day. At the limit dosage of 2,000 mg/kg b.w., all three rats died after one hour of administration.
Clinical signs:
There were no effects on body weight increase in all surviving animals. The typical clinical signs of tested animals at 2,000 mg/kg b.w. were nasal discharge, hypoactivity, piloerection, prone position, reddish change and edema on ears, fore-legs and hind-legs. At 300 mg/kg b.w., all animals showed hypoactivity and piloerection on day 1 and some animals showed soft stool on day 2. However, these clinical signs were recovered to the normal status from day 3.
Body weight:
There were no effects on body weight increase in all surviving animals.
Gross pathology:
The necropsy of the tested animals at 2,000 mg/kg b.w. showed hemorrhage on lymphatic nodes, stomach, intestine and thymus. Also, there was hypertrophy of pancreas and spleen. In one dead animal of the 300 mg/kg b.w. group, hemorrhage on lymphatic nodes and intestine was observed.
There was no abnormality observed by microscopic examination of the surviving animals of the 300 mg/kg b.w. group after sacrifice on day 15.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Interpretation of results:
Category 4 based on GHS criteria
Conclusions:
Information was gathered from a peer-reviewed report / collection of data, hence, the information can be considered as sufficiently reliable to assess the acute oral toxicity of the test item. The LD50 value for acute oral toxicity of rats was between 300 and 2,000 mg/kg body weight, hence, it must be classified as acute toxic Cat. 4 acc. Regulation 1272/2008.
Executive summary:

In a toxicity test performed by OECD TG 423 (Acute Toxic Class Method) with GLP control, the LD50 value of the test item for acute oral toxicity of females Sprague-Dawley rats was between 300 and 2,000 mg/kg body weight.