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Description of key information

Short description of key information on bioaccumulation potential result: 
Adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion are important components in developing an understanding of the potential health effects of a material and of extrapolating data between studies, between routes of administration and between compounds. In the case of the registered substance, the mixture is too complex to fully characterize metabolically; however, some generalities are useful in understanding the interrelationships of the components and why data from the long chain alcohol components can be used to estimate the overall toxicity of the registered substance.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Bioaccumulation potential:
low bioaccumulation potential

Additional information

Adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion are important components in developing an understanding of the potential health effects of a material and of extrapolating data between studies, between routes of administration and between compounds. In the case of the registered substance, the mixture is too complex to fully characterize metabolically; however, some generalities are useful in understanding the interrelationships of the components and why data from the long chain alcohol components can be used to estimate the overall toxicity of the registered substance.

 

Although there are marked differences in the structures and physicochemical properties of the components of the registered substance, their mammalian toxicity potential is largely similar due to common metabolic pathways and common metabolites. The basic structure in the composition of this material is the aliphatic chain with an oxygen-containing group. The esters, for example, in the body will be subject to rapid carboxylesterase catalyzed hydrolysis to the corresponding alcohol and carboxylic acid. The alcohols are known to undergo oxidative metabolism to the corresponding carboxylic acid (fatty acid). As a wide variety of different chain length and configurations of fatty acids compose a significant portion of the mammalian diet, the body has developed effective metabolic pathways to convert these fatty acids into energy and building blocks for growth and maintenance of bodily function. Mitochondrial beta-oxidation, which removes two-carbon units from a fatty acid, is the best-known pathway for metabolism of fatty acids and is known to “detoxify” large quantities of dietary fatty acids daily. The branched fatty acids cannot undergo beta-oxidation, but as branched fatty acids are also a normal part of the mammalian diet, the body has developed an effective means to detoxify branched fatty acids, specifically peroxisomal alpha-oxidation. Likewise, higher olefinic compounds can be oxidized, initially to two aldehydes, which are readily converted into the carboxylic acids that form the common metabolic pathway for mammalian metabolism of the registered substance.

Discussion on bioaccumulation potential result:

Although there are marked differences in the structures and physicochemical properties of the components of the registered substance, their mammalian toxicity potential is largely similar due to common metabolic pathways and common metabolites. The basic structure in the composition of this material is the aliphatic chain with an oxygen-containing group. The esters, for example, in the body will be subject to rapid carboxylesterase catalyzed hydrolysis to the corresponding alcohol and carboxylic acid. The alcohols are known to undergo oxidative metabolism to the corresponding carboxylic acid (fatty acid). As a wide variety of different chain length and configurations of fatty acids compose a significant portion of the mammalian diet, the body has developed effective metabolic pathways to convert these fatty acids into energy and building blocks for growth and maintenance of bodily function. Mitochondrial beta-oxidation, which removes two-carbon units from a fatty acid, is the best-known pathway for metabolism of fatty acids and is known to “detoxify” large quantities of dietary fatty acids daily. The branched fatty acids cannot undergo beta-oxidation, but as branched fatty acids are also a normal part of the mammalian diet, the body has developed an effective means to detoxify branched fatty acids, specifically peroxisomal alpha-oxidation. Likewise, higher olefinic compounds can be oxidized, initially to two aldehydes, which are readily converted into the carboxylic acids that form the common metabolic pathway for mammalian metabolism of the registered substance.

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