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Ecotoxicological information

Ecotoxicological Summary

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Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (freshwater)
PNEC value:
0.3 µg/L
Assessment factor:
1 000
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (marine water)
PNEC value:
0.03 µg/L
Assessment factor:
10 000
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC STP
PNEC value:
100 mg/L
Assessment factor:
10
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (freshwater)
PNEC value:
1.4 µg/kg sediment dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (marine water)
PNEC value:
0.14 µg/kg sediment dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC soil
PNEC value:
0.1 µg/kg soil dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no potential for bioaccumulation

Additional information

Conclusion on classification

In acute aquatic toxicity studies, the substance did not induce effects in fish and daphnia. Based on two algae tests, performed with and without phosphate in the test medium, it was concluded that effects seen in the test with phosphate in the test medium were caused by a combination of test substance related phosphate depletion and intrinsic toxicity of the test substance towards algae. In view of the low ErC10 (0.12 mg/L), classification needs to be investigated. Regular CLP rules do not apply as the substance is inorganic (for which biodegradation is not meaningful). In such case, a different evaluation scheme applies: in principle, transformation dissolution (T/D) testing should be done with inorganic substances, but because the substance is an oxide, the metal already exists the oxidized state, so that further metal oxidation is unlikely to occur when the compound is introduced into an aqueous medium. Therefore, further testing is not considered necessary. Consequently, acute classification does not apply.

For chronic classification, the classification strategy for metal compounds in Annex IV, section IV.5.3, of the Guidance on the Application of the CLP Criteria (version 5.0 - July 2017) should be followed. As an ERV (Ecotoxicity Reference Value) for Yttrium could not be established, the results of the algae tests performed with Yttrium oxide, europium doped are used as surrogate for both acute and chronic ERV. As worst-case, the 72h-ErC50 of >0.30 mg/L (35.7% inhibition) is set as acute ERV and the ErC10 of 0.12 mg/L is set as chronic ERV. According to the decision tree in Fig. IV.5, the surrogate approach in Fig. IV.6 should be used since a chronic ERV is available, the substance is not readily soluble (solubility of < 0.663 ug/L, which is lower than the acute ERV), the chronic ERVcompound is lower than 1 mg/L, and 28 days T/D full test data are not available. Following the decision tree in Fig. IV.6, the substance should be classified in the safety net category, Chronic 4: the acute ERV is available and lower than 100 mg/L, the substance is not readily soluble and 7 days T/D full test data are not available. This classification does not require a GHS pictogram or signal word; hazard statement H413, precautionary statement P273 and P501 are applicable.