Registration Dossier

Diss Factsheets

Physical & Chemical properties

Vapour pressure

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Link to relevant study record(s)

Reference
Endpoint:
vapour pressure
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Study period:
August 1, 1989
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
data from handbook or collection of data
Justification for type of information:
Contents
Description of tables of property constants; description of tables of equation coefficients; synonyms list; key for equation forms; general references; list of compound names.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780891169482 20160527

These tables are a compilation of recommended physical, thermodynamic, and transport properties used in chemical process calculations and equipment design. Extensive tabulations of physical constants and equations for calculations and equations for calculating temperature dependent properties are given. Both new compound and revisions will be published periodically. The looseleaf format has been adopted to accommodate these revisions. The compilation now includes over 900 compounds and will eventually reach 1500 compounds.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780891169482 20160527
Qualifier:
no guideline available
Principles of method if other than guideline:
No more details available, database match.
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of method:
other: measured
Temp.:
25 °C
Vapour pressure:
0.044 mm Hg
Conclusions:
The vapour pressure of diethyl succinate was determined to be: 0.0439 mm Hg, equivalent to 5.9 Pa, at 25 deg C.
Executive summary:

The vapour pressure of diethyl succinate was determined to be: 0.0439 mm Hg, equivalent to 5.9 Pa, at 25 deg C.

Description of key information

Vapour pressure: 5.9 Pa at 25 deg C.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Vapour pressure:
5.9 Pa
at the temperature of:
25 °C

Additional information

Vapour pressure of diethyl succinate was found to be 5.9 Pa at 25 deg C and stongly agrees with the estimated value of 9.9 Pa at the same temperature.