Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Hydrolysis

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Type of information:
read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Data are from a peer reviewed source.
Justification for type of information:
A discussion and report on the read across strategy is given as an attachment in IUCLID Section 13.
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
read-across source
Reference
Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Type of information:
other: Technical Discussion
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Data are from a peer reviewed source.
Justification for type of information:
A discussion and report on the read across strategy is given as an attachment in IUCLID Section 13.
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
read-across: supporting information
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Technical discussion
GLP compliance:
not specified
Conclusions:
Hydrolysis is not expected to be a significant mechanism of degradation in the environment because hydrocarbons, C14-20 Aliphatics (≤2% aromatics) lack a hydrotically reactive functional group. Therefore, hydrocarbons are not subject to hydrolysis and this fate process will not contribute to the degradative loss of the substance from the environment.
Executive summary:

Hydrolysis is a reaction in which a water molecule of hydroxide ion substitutes for another atom of group of atoms present in a chemical resulting in a structural change of that chemical. Potentially hydrolysable groups include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactone epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a suitable leaving group renders compounds resistant to hydrolysis.

The chemical constituents that comprise hydrocarbons, C14-20 Aliphatics (≤2% aromatics) consist entirely of carbon and hydrogen and do not contain hydrolysable groups. As such, they have a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore this degradative process will not contribute to their removal from the environment.

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Hydrolysis
Author:
Neely, W.B.
Year:
1985
Bibliographic source:
In: Environmental exposure from chemicals" (Neely, W.B. & Blau, G.E., Eds), Vol. I, Academic Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA: 157-173
Reference Type:
other: Handbook
Title:
Chapter 8. Rate of Aqueous Photolysis.
Author:
Harris
Year:
1982
Bibliographic source:
In: Handbook of Chemical Property Estimation Methods. W. J. Lyman, W. F. Reehl and D. H. Rosenblatt, eds. McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, USA.
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
No information
Author:
Gould
Year:
1959

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
Technical discussion
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Constituent 1
Reference substance name:
C14-16 (even numbered) and C16 (branched) saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons
EC Number:
700-762-0
Molecular formula:
All molecules present in the mixture have the general molecular formula CnH2n for olefins or CnH2n+2 for the paraffin’s with n being an even number
IUPAC Name:
C14-16 (even numbered) and C16 (branched) saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons
Test material form:
liquid: viscous

Results and discussion

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Hydrolysis is not expected to be a significant mechanism of degradation in the environment because hydrocarbons, C14-20 Aliphatics (≤2% aromatics) lack a hydrotically reactive functional group. Therefore, hydrocarbons are not subject to hydrolysis and this fate process will not contribute to the degradative loss of the substance from the environment.
Executive summary:

Hydrolysis is a reaction in which a water molecule of hydroxide ion substitutes for another atom of group of atoms present in a chemical resulting in a structural change of that chemical. Potentially hydrolysable groups include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactone epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a suitable leaving group renders compounds resistant to hydrolysis.

The chemical constituents that comprise hydrocarbons, C14-20 Aliphatics (≤2% aromatics) consist entirely of carbon and hydrogen and do not contain hydrolysable groups. As such, they have a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore this degradative process will not contribute to their removal from the environment.